Memory Travel Games

When planning a journey, a few moments spent to print out game rules and pack travel games can turn a long road trip into a time to enjoy the company of friends and family. Playing memory games gives adults a chance to sharpen their memory skills, and gives children the chance to beat their elders.

The Alphabet Game

Kids enjoy playing the Alphabet Game, in which the first player starts by saying "I am going on a journey and I am bringing with me ..." something that begins with the letter "A," such as an apple. The next player says, "I am going on a journey and I am bringing with me an Apple and a Bottle." The game continues down the alphabet until the last person to make a mistake wins the game.

This game has many variants. For example, younger children may practice their alphabet skills by following "A is for alligator" with "B is for balloon," and so forth. It is also possible to limit the choices to animals, countries or movie stars.

When I Get There

When I Get There is another variant of the list game. Here, the first player announces his intentions when he reaches the destination: "When I get there, I'm going to take a shower." The next player declares, "When I get there, I'm going to take a shower and buy myself a soda." The game continues with the next player, "When I get there, I'm going to take a shower, buy myself a soda, and steal your socks." This game continues until only one player is left or the plans get hopelessly silly.

There and Back

This game requires paper, pencil, and some patience, as it is only completed on the return trip. On the way to the destination, one player points out and writes down a list of 20 landmarks in the order that they appear. On the way back, the other players must remember all of the landmarks before the other players spot them. In a more difficult variant, each player keeps his or her own list of 10 landmarks, which the others must memorize. The person who remembers the most landmarks in the correct order wins.

Concentration

Many travel versions of the old game of Concentration exist. Two sets of identical pictures on cards are shuffled and arranged face down, and players take turns flipping over two cards at a time. If a player turns over a matched pair of pictures, he or she gets to keep the pair. Otherwise, the pair has to be flipped face down again. You can create your own travel version of this game by gluing magnets to the backs of cards and playing it on a metal cookie pan, or else purchase a ready-made travel memory game.